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Petra Buddrus

  • Local films outclass US fare in Scandinavia


    Local Scandinavian films are giving the US majors' summer releases a hard run for their money at the box office across a number of Nordic territories.
  • Bittersweet success for The Greatest Thing


    After years of commercial disappointment, which earlier this year saw the closure of the studio, Norwegian state-owned production company Norsk Film last week-end found the success it had long been denied with the release of its final film, The Greatest Thing (Den Storste I Verden).
  • Danish comedy laughing all the way to the bank


    Danish producer Regner Grasten has proved once again, with the release of Anja & Viktor through BVI, that he runs the most successful Danish production company when it comes to local box office performance.
  • Sweden renews company funding policy


    The Swedish Film Institute has announced that it is to continue its policy of backing independent producers and production companies rather than individual productions.
  • Hallstrom's confection pleases his local audience


    Swedish director Lasse Hallstrom might not have received his Oscar yet, despite two consecutive best picture nominations, but in his home territory he has once again confirmed his box office appeal and status as more than just 'flavour of the month' with the release of Chocolat.
  • Local films have legs, Hannibal has teeth


    Norwegian documentary Heftig Og Begeistret, directed by Knut Erik Jensen, continues to hold strong at the local box office, where the box office share of local films is one of the lowest in Europe (5-7%). It has grossed $1,023,922, achieving admissions of 169,464 to March 4, and after 7 weeks on release still holds second place. The hit opened on just 10 prints but has since expanded onto 31, a rare occurrence in the territory. The film, distributed by Europafilm, follows a male ...
  • Sweden supports local hits, but The Emperor rules


    Local productions dominated the Swedish box office over the last week (ending February 22) with indigenous titles filling four of the top five positions in the territory, although the chart was topped by BVI's The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Record start for Finnish Rose


    Finnish production Rose Of The Rascal (Rentun Ruusu) has become the highest grossing indigenous opener in Finland. The drama, which opened on January 12, grossed $382,496 (FIM2,256,725) on 38 screens on the first weekend and achieved admissions of 50,738.
  • 101 Reykjavik whips up a storm in Norway


    Icelandic feature 101 Reykjavik, directed by Baltasar Kormakur, made an impressive entry into the Norwegian box office in fifth place. The film, distributed by SEG, grossed $49,154 from eight screens during its first week on release, easily beating fellow opener Urban Legends: Final Cut, distributed by ECT, which made $33,423 from 15 screens during the same period. 101 Reykjavik maintained its strong position in the Norwegian box office over the weekend of Nov 24-26, ...
  • Help! I'm A Fish sinks competition in Denmark


    Danish animation Help! I Am A Fish is currently storming the Danish box office, sinking local competitor Dancer In the Dark. Just two weeks after its release Help! I Am A Fish has achieved admissions of 177,243 and a gross of $915,945 (DKR8,101,536) from 60 screens. In comparison Lars von Triar's Dancer In The Dark has grossed $885,020 (DKR7,827,999) - the equivalent of 151,904 admissions - after six weeks.
  • Norwegian government axes Norsk Film


    In a move widely supported by the local film industry, the Norwegian culture ministry has decided to close state-owned production company Norsk Film and replace it with a new financing body The Norwegian Film Fund (NFF).
  • Faithless falters against other local product


    While Scandinavian film-makers Lars von Trier and Liv Ullmann received plenty of positive international attention at this year's Cannes Film Festival, both directors have been hit hard by the local, and often much younger, competition at the box office in their respective home territories.
  • Dancer In The Dark disappoints in Scandinavia


  • Moodysson follows up on early promise


    Sweden is currently enjoying the release of Together (Tillsammans), the second feature film by the country's most promising director Lukas Moodysson whose Fucking Amal (aka Show Me Love) in 1999 became one of the most successful Scandinavian films ever.
  • Sandrews strikes gold with Detector


    Following the lack of government funding in 1999 and 2000, only a few Norwegian films have been released so far this year. But the August 25 opening of Pal Jackman's Detector has been received enthusiastically by local audiences pulling in a three-day opening weekend gross of $208,939 (NKr1,842,841) from 31 screens (29,680 admissions).
  • Iceland's 101 stands tall against Gladiator


    The North American summer box office got a reprieve over the five day holiday weekend, as Warner Bros' The Perfect Storm led the pack to an all-time record Independence Day weekend. At Tuesday, total box office for the weekend was estimated at $193m with predictions for the seven days ending Thursday of around $235m - up from last year's record of $222.5m.The Perfect Storm grossed a massive estimated $64m over the five day weekend - a particularly ripe period this year because ...
  • Haugesund to open with Norway's Jesus


    Highly-anticipated Norwegian title When I Hit Jesus (Da Jeg Traff Jesus) is to open this year's Haugesund International Film Festival (August 26 - Sep 2).
  • Angels sets Icelandic record


    Icelandic director-producer Fridrik Thor Fridriksson's latest offering, Angels Of The Universe, has become Iceland's highest-grossing domestic film, racking up an unprecedented 77,233 admissions when it re-entered the box office chart this week.
  • Swedish directing duo deliver third hit


    Swedish directing duo Maans Herngren and Hannes Holm flexed their box office muscle once again with their third film, Shit Happens (Det Blir Aldrig Som Man Taenkt Sig). After two weeks, the comedy, about a TV soap actress trying to juggle her family and professional life, has taken $1.2m and remains at the top of the Swedish chart, despite competition from American Beauty and The Talented Mr Ripley.
  • Finland's Restless knocks down Beauty, Joan


    Finnish production Restless (Levottomat) has attracted 54,125 admissions in its first week on release, beating American Beauty to the number one slot with a box office gross of $372,337. The impressive opening is the biggest in Finland for a local film since the 1989 release of The Winter War which remains the country's most successful domestic production with total admissions of 628,767. Directed by Aku Louhimies, Restless is produced by Markus Selin for ...
  • Canal Plus Nordic reports subscriptions increase


    Canal Plus' Nordic pay-TV subsidiary has reported a 37% increase in subscriptions during 1999.
  • Skin Of A Man wins at Tromso festival


    French production Peau D'Homme, Coeur De Bete (Skin Of A Man, Heart Of A Beast), directed by Helene Angel, picked up the Don Quixote Award at this year's Tromso International Film Festival (Jan 18-23).The award was founded by the international union of film clubs (FICC).